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Covid-19 Facts and Statistics for the General Public


The 1889 Institute has published a new webpage on its website explicitly about Covid-19. Its purpose is to provide the best current information for dealing with the pandemic to the general public and policy makers. It also tracks official new daily positive tests and daily deaths, showing trends in the data.

It seems like new information, some of it reported out of proper context or highly speculative, is being reported by authorities and researchers every day. Information provided by the Centers for Disease Control is oriented toward health professionals. We wanted to provide good information that is easily digestible.

This continues the effort that we promised in an earlier blog post. We hope the information is useful and welcome feedback.

Included on the COVID-19 webpage are:

  • A graphic showing daily positive tests/deaths and 7-day averages,
  • Who is NOT vulnerable,
  • Who IS vulnerable,
  • Information on the relationship between age and COVID-19 vulnerability,
  • How COVID-19 is transmitted from person to person,
  • Information on mask efficacy,
  • The effects of societal lockdowns,
  • Information about herd immunity and its importance,
  • Recommendations for the general public and policymakers.
All information is sourced with hyperlinks.

Byron Schlomach is Director of the 1889 Institute. He can be reached at bschlomach@1889institute.org

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